Human Papilloma Virus

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I’ll use the NY making it law to get into it  you, so how about my questions be:

(So new York is still pending approval for this law and it  is currently in the committee and has a few more steps to go for approval) . Florida has declined the bill a few times now and most recently this past May 2019. There are 3 states That currently require HPV for school attendance and this is Rhode Island,  Virginia and Washington DC. 


1. What is HPV?

HPV stands for Human papilloma virus a form of warts that can become cancerous. It is the most common cause of cervical cancer, penile cancer and esophagus cancer. 

It is usually sexually transmitted but does not require intercourse to spread because it is a type of wart so it only requires skin to skin contact. (??? Can I talk about sex? And say penis?). 

There are more than 100 types of HPV warts. 13 that are cancer causing and  the vaccine covers for nine subtypes . It covers Types 6,11, 16,18,31, 33,45, 52 and 58

**types 16 and 18 causing more than 70 percent by themselves*



2. What do docs recommend?

It is recommended to both girls and boys to protect against HPV prior to exposure so kids starting at ages 9-11 yrs may start receiving the vaccine up to age 45. Which was an additional recommendation this past year. Prior to that the cut off was 26.

3. How does it help?

There are 14 million new HPV infections that occur each year 50% of them ( so 7 million) are in people ages 15 to 24 years old. for some people it does clear they don’t all turn into cancer but if it doesn’t clear your system it does turn into cancer. 


The types of cancer that can be prevented are: cervical, vulvar, vaginal, anal cancer,  venereal warts and esophageal cancer.  

HPV causes: 

- nearly ALL cases of cervical cancer

-more than 70% of all oropharyngeal cancers. 


Safety: 

The biggest concern then I get questions about is how safe is it? “It has not been around long enough”.  This has been around for 13 years now. And  before a vaccine is released they have to go through many years of safety testing by the FDA and after it is licensed the CDC and the FDA monitor the side effects. The most common side effects are pain, redness or swelling at the injection site fever headache, dizziness or tiredness. 


For more info go to cdc.gov where you can watch videos and find podcasts for more info. 

Help your kids:  Be one less!! One less cancer victim.